Tag Archives: Liberal Democrats

Referendum: A Poor Form of Democracy

The most prominent rebuke I receive on social media, when trying to persuade leave voters of the folly that we are taking the UK into, is “We had a democratic vote, respect democracy!”. I wouldn’t mind so much, if this were also supported by rational, thought out arguments giving the case for why they voted as they did, but this is rarely, if ever, the case.

My challenge to this most favoured of rebukes is two-fold. First, nothing is forever – most of all public opinion, which can change with the wind. Second, that referenda a fundamentally incompatible with British democratic process.

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Labour’s Regressive Momentum

I have this theory that collective society has a working memory of about 20 years – sometimes longer depending on the severity of what has come to pass. The rise of popular Corbynism, and the Momentum campaign movement supporting it (together with a, fringe, distinctively militant social media presence) demonstrates to me that we have forgotten why we moved away from the policies of the 60’s and 70’s and this is being presented to our young voters as something radical, progressive and new. The truth is that the manifesto that Labour published for the 2017 General Election is regressive, vastly increasing the role and power of the State, and stifling economic growth. The fact that the Institute of Fiscal Studies was unable to cost it highlights how the manifesto has been kept intentionally vague, so as not to reveal the full implications of delivering it.

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You may take our EU, but you will never take our Freedom

Of movement, that is. It is hard to describe the feeling of dejection, and the frustration with my fellow countrymen, that I felt as the results of the EU referendum became clear. The people of the UK had voted to leave the European Union. The one question going round and round in my head without respite, was “Why?”.

I appreciate that the benefits of Freedom of Movement that I have enjoyed, are certainly not typical of the average British citizen, and are certainly of the more obvious in nature. In the December of 2007, I applied for a role within the organisation that I was working, the details of which were shrouded in secrecy, and related to a project only referred to in code names. By the time I learned that I had been successful in landing the job, I was already en route to visit my parents’ house in the Charente region of France, where we would have our family get together over Christmas.

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